Get e-book Comanche Moon (Lonesome Dove, Book 4)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Comanche Moon (Lonesome Dove, Book 4) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Comanche Moon (Lonesome Dove, Book 4) book. Happy reading Comanche Moon (Lonesome Dove, Book 4) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Comanche Moon (Lonesome Dove, Book 4) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Comanche Moon (Lonesome Dove, Book 4) Pocket Guide.

He lives in Archer City, Texas. McMurtry knows how to deploy his most suspenseful episodes for maximum effect. Kilpatrick, Library Journal. By clicking 'Sign me up' I acknowledge that I have read and agree to the privacy policy and terms of use. Must redeem within 90 days. See full terms and conditions and this month's choices. Tell us what you like, so we can send you books you'll love. Sign up and get a free eBook! Trade Paperback.

Price may vary by retailer. Add to Cart Add to Cart. It's the only time when a book has made me physically ill. Seriously, it's beyond gross. But still a kickass piece of historical fiction. Oct 31, John rated it liked it Recommends it for: anyone that wants a mindless western epic. Shelves: my-quizzes. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. I've put together a quiz perhaps you'll like it. Lots of pages, not much depth. Fast reading story. Not much depth. Ummm did i say "not much depth? The only thing the man ever roped on the first try was himself. That's a curiosity, ain't it? Nov 21, Widespread rated it really liked it. For me, and probably for many others, this series has been a shock to the system, but also a vital awakening to an Old West more horrible than we had imagined. But the beauty of these books is not in the horror; for that you can read Cormac McCarthy. McMurtry's gimlet eyed realism is leavened by a Dickensian heart, and his characters throb with immediacy.

I will take Larry over Cormac any day. View 1 comment. Sep 18, Pete rated it really liked it.

"Comanche Moon" pales against Western classic

All of McMurtry's books are peopled by the most fascinating characters in American literature. Nov 11, Cphe rated it it was amazing Shelves: historical , western , absolutely-fabulous. My favourite of the Lonesome Dove series, who could forget the chillingly evil Blue Duck? Lots of the characters get back stories and there are surprises as they move forward. Mar 02, Philipp rated it liked it Shelves: america , western. Much, much better than the preceding Deadman's Walk - there's more focus on Gus and Call, but also much more from the perspective of Native Americans.

I guess McMurtry follows the Stephen King school of writing, i. Still, the world McMurtry builds here is alive, and worth another visit. In my previous post about "Dead Man's Walk", you met the main characters in their late teens as they first become Rangers.

Comanche Moon - 2008 Part 1

The story in this book, picks up the main characters ten 10 years later. Both Cal and Augustus have grown up, but so has Texas and the Rangers. This is reflected throughout the story. You no longer see the impetuous, brazen, and immature young men. Instead, you meat two men who have grown up and are dedicated to their calling. Unlike the previous book, there is a greater deal of humor woven into this story.

The bond between Cal and Augustus has been clearly cemented. These two could not be any different from one another. But the dependence or reliance upon each other is strong. This is clearly portrayed at one point in which both of them have to save the troop when they are appointed co-Captains. The inner struggle how to accomplish this as well as which way to proceed it the conflict at the moment.

Instead of working against each other, the reliance an dependence upon one another helps them to put aside their personnel feelings and wants, and listen seriously the other. Oh how they have grown up, how much they believe in each other, how much do they believe in the Rangers.

For the sake of the troop, for what made the most sense, they reach a compromise which saves the themselves and saves the troop. You will also meet all the primary characters who will continue on into the book everyone has read: "Lonesome Dove". You will better understand who these men are, and what made them what they are. And how all these secondary characters play in their lives. You will also have a greater understanding as to what is important to each man and what they value.

What one is the other is not. What one lacks the other has. This is what brings these two together and dependent upon the other. For each becomes stronger because of the other. This story is well written. Good believable character development is a must for me and thus far in both of these books, this more than accomplished.

I also like Larry McMurtry's sense of reality. There is no romanizing the life these people live. Death seems to be lurking constantly around the corner and it is cruel, gruesome, and cold. Yet, Mr. McMurty writes with just enough detail to get his point across without having to delve into gross and horrific detail.

The story line is real. A story of living in a hard time, when Texas was coming out of the wild wilderness full of Indians and Mexicans, war and attacks. When Texas was trying to identify herself and find her way in the world. These were the men who were going to give her the ability to survive and shape her future. Life and your place in the world, that is what these men were. Your name, your integrity, that was well worth it's weight in gold. Then there are the humorous incidents, and regrettable mistakes these men experience and make.

Just as in real life, the decisions we make, the ones we wish we could do over, and the consequences we live with for the rest of our lives, that shape our lives. This is what makes this book such a pleasure to listen to. I am glad that I am reading these book in order chronological order as opposed to order of publication. For I am seeing them grow up, seeing what shaped and influence their lives. I will know these men now that I am starting "Lonesome Dove". They will already be good friends whom i have come to know and respect.

Feb 12, A rated it really liked it Shelves: overallstar , settingstar. Plot — 4, Characters — 4, Theme — 3, Voice — 4, Setting — 5, Overall — 4 1 Plot 4 stars — After his horse is taken by a famous Comanche thief, an old Texas Ranger captain sets off after him on foot only to end up in one of the most brutal Mexican bandit camps on the frontier. To me, that was the plot. Much more than the adventures of Call and Gus, the usual protagonists of the Lonesome Dove series.

And I eagerly ate up the pages about the ornery captain, the clever Comanches, and the torturin Plot — 4, Characters — 4, Theme — 3, Voice — 4, Setting — 5, Overall — 4 1 Plot 4 stars — After his horse is taken by a famous Comanche thief, an old Texas Ranger captain sets off after him on foot only to end up in one of the most brutal Mexican bandit camps on the frontier.

The Comanches were not savages, nor were they saints; they were not simply white men in loin clothes, but nor were they so alien as to not have human hopes and fears. And the Mexican bandits were so enthrallingly cruel—skinning people alive, hanging them in cages from cliffs, cutting off eyelids … what an awful and fascinating spectacle to watch from afar.

McMurtry does an amazing job with each culture, showing us what it would be like to be in the head of someone raised in that worldview e. McMurtry shows us a time of rugged and brave men, and perhaps he wanted to say something about the virtues of courage and adventure. But, unfortunately in this book, many sections felt unedited.

He would say the same thing three of four times in the same paragraph. It is an expansive, dangerous, difficult place, and he drops you right in the middle of it to fend for yourself. Comanche Moon, however, is a good book. Mar 08, Paul rated it really liked it. Another excellent cog in the machinery that is the Lonesome Dove saga. Enjoyed this tome more than Dead Man's Walk, being longer, and evincing more of the Native American point of view. McMurtry's writing is timely in scope, as the Comanches were being forced on to reservations at the time of this book's history, pre and post civil war, so the musings of the Indians lends a great flavor to the story.

The old ways were going away, and he made it a beautiful lament in the book. The great Indian Chief Buffalo Hump's story is particularly poignant. The characters in Lonesome Dove and Dead Man's Walk are woven expertly into the story as well, and the backstories flesh out the total perfectly. So once again, the good guys are lamenting their roles as Texas Rangers in many ways, staving off the boredom and heartache with drinking mostly, and feeling out their eventual destinies in no short order. The Indians are giving a last gasp, raiding in a massive raid all the way to the ocean or Gulf as it were and growing tired and angry over their eventual fates.

The bad guys are still truly evil, and you want them at the end of a rope. Nothing is easy on the dusty llano, though. Death moves fast and randomly throughout this story. The Black Vaquero bandit Ahumado is as vile as a villain can get. Skinning people alive is just one of his pleasures, eek. Badass criminals of his ilk are hard to kill, however. They dominate this story with boldness, sass, and larger-than-life vivacity. They are both true forces of nature, the grandiose, whimsical and educated Inish Scull and his lustful, disrespectful southern wife, Inez Scull, a daughter of the plantations of the south.

They shine brightly, and go hard at everything they do. Amazing story lines there. So a wonderful book overall, and a grand statement before the final episode I'll be reading next, The Streets of Laredo, which takes place 20 years after Lonesome Dove's story line, and is the last book in the chronology. Can't wait to wrap up these wonderful books. A tour de force. May 03, Jeneden rated it really liked it. Comanche Moon was sad in many places, gruesome in others, but ultimately lovely and satisfying. McMurtry's descriptions of the West at this particular moment in history really puts you there.

He delves into the psychology of all of his central characters which allows one to consider what was ultimately a war, from all angles. You get a feel for what it was like to be Rangers, Comanches, other Native Americans, Military Commanders, Native Mexicans, a Free African American, Prostitutes, wives, you Comanche Moon was sad in many places, gruesome in others, but ultimately lovely and satisfying.

You lament the loss of the Comanche territory with the dying of the last great warriors, although at the same time you find them fearsome and terrible for having committed torture throughout their lives. One interesting lack of depth is the character of the settler. They are mentioned throughout as relentlessly encroaching on the West, spreading like ants, and they are killed often in the book, described mostly for the horrible deaths they meet rather than meeting any of them in particular.

Pan Macmillan's trade news has a new home

One captive woman is followed briefly but only as a means to demonstrate how the Comanches, the Rangers and society deals with her upon her return. I think it is a perfect second part in this series having read part 3 - Lonesome Dove - first, and part 1 - Dead Man's Walk second. I don't understand other people's objections to continuity problems, but then again, my memory isn't necessarily that detail oriented so I didn't notice any disconnect between this and the other two books.

Then again, in life we often remember things incorrectly anyway, and I felt that this book explained well how Gus and Call move from being young Texas Rangers to seasoned professionals, to looking forward to their semi-retirement in Lonesome Dove. If anyone is considering reading this series, I do think reading Lonesome Dove first makes the most sense, as it's definitely the major work and once hooked, reading further into the prequels and sequel after.

Sep 23, Kevin Symmons rated it it was ok. In general, while I fancy myself a serious student of western history and novels that describe that ilk, I have found the Lonesome Dove group far too graphic for my liking. I understand that the real west and the conflict that existed between white settlers and their Native American counterparts often resulted in tragic, even disturbing consequences.

Comanche Moon by Larry McMurtry

The problem I have with the LD novels is these activities are spelled out in such explicit, thorough and frankly disgusting detail. I found many of In general, while I fancy myself a serious student of western history and novels that describe that ilk, I have found the Lonesome Dove group far too graphic for my liking.


  • Film Genre Reader IV;
  • The Forgotten Soldier: He wasnt a soldier, he was just a boy!
  • Trust Me, Im Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator.

I found many of the passages difficult to read. I seldom put down a book that I have purchased, especially from such a noted author. I did this one. I get sick of reading about abuse, rape, sadistic and systematic torture, assaults, peoples eyes being put out, etc. I'm sure it happened but these continual and heinous acts transport me away from the story all too often.

Frankly, I found the film TV generally versions of these far more engaging. I have watched every minute of Lonesome Dove, Streets on Laredo and the other mini-series many times.

Oh no, there's been an error

Fortunately,due to censorship much of the more graphic and gruesome detail is missing Praise be to heaven! A word about this novel before I get back to the business of writing reviews of serious, high-toned literature. I also finished Streets of Loredo recently. I have a theory about Comanche Moon. Mere speculation actually. I suspect that Larry McMurtry read Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy before undertaking this project and was swept away by it--so swept away by it that he allowed it to influence his own ende A word about this novel before I get back to the business of writing reviews of serious, high-toned literature.

Thank you for joining our email list!

I suspect that Larry McMurtry read Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy before undertaking this project and was swept away by it--so swept away by it that he allowed it to influence his own endeavor. Now, Cormac McCarthy impresses me, too. I speak of the violence, torture, rape, etc. Nice little nod in this novel, however, to William H. Prescott, the author of the classic The Conquest of Mexico , one of my all time favorite histories.

I did appreciate that. Jan 18, Catherine Mustread rated it it was amazing Shelves: historical , mexico , american-indian , texas , award. Book 2 chronologically in the Lonesome Dove series , though the last of the four books in the series to be published Covers the roughly 20 years in the lives of a band of Texas Rangers, primarily focusing on two captains, Augustus "Gus" McCrae and Woodrow Call and their efforts to fight the Comanche and also battles in their personal lives during the s.

McMurtry's storytelling ability and descriptions of the rugged Texas life of the era is superb and keeps the story moving through. The characters, with their imperfections, are great examples of how the west was tamed and some of the final efforts of the Comanches to maintain their independence. English audio. CC Unrated. Movies Anywhere. Watch your purchase on Movies Anywhere supported devices. Once you select Rent you'll have 14 days to start watching the movie and 48 hours to finish it. Can't play on this device. Check system requirements. Available on Xbox One.

Mobile device. Xbox Cast and crew.